Evidence-Informed Policymaking Reading List | March 2018

What to Read this Month

“Although the awareness and interest in evidence-informed policymaking has gained momentum in Nigeria, meeting points, such as policymakers’ engagement events to consider issues around the research-policy interface related to MNCH, are essentially lacking.”
This article summarizes the barriers to and facilitators of evidence-informed health policymaking in Nigeria and highlights a need to strengthen capacity at the individual and organizational levels (skills, systems, and processes) to facilitate the evidence to policy process.

“However, while there is a problem when civil servants don’t understand statistics or how to weigh up which evidence sources are reliable, fixing these problems won’t help improve policy if there is no political space to bring evidence into decision making, and no incentives for senior decision makers to care about evidence.”
The final, independent evaluation of the DFID Building Capacity to Use Research Evidence (BCURE) program found that partners were more successful when they went beyond building individual skills and capacities, and engaged with politics and incentives to create changes in the organization and wider environment.

“Many governments collect vast amounts of data, but need support to organize it in a usable format and identify use cases to improve program management.”
Through its government partnerships in Brazil, Chile, Colombia, and Peru, J-PAL has found that in addition to great leadership, the following strategies help support evidence-informed policymaking in government: making it someone’s job to use evidence, helping governments make better use of the data they already collect, investing in long-term partnerships, and taking on quick wins that can build trust and demand for evidence.

“Policy narratives are ‘the communication vehicles that are used for conveying and organizing policy information’, and the development of policy can be understood as a ‘narrative-making’ process.”
This article describes how education policymakers in Australia commonly referenced policy narratives when describing evidence use in their policy development process, and how these narratives in turn helped the research team better make sense of the different ways in which policymakers were using evidence. The article suggests that examining how evidence informs construction, testing, and communication of policy stories or narratives may be a promising and less abstract approach for understanding evidence use in policy development given how prominently narratives and stories feature in policymaking.

“There is an increasing need to develop faster and more reliable learning processes to solve problems and, at the same time, strengthen the trust between citizen and policy institutions. Policy experiments are a great way to do this.”
In this interview, Mikko Annala, Head of Governance Innovation at Demos Helsinki, a Finnish independent think tank, shares three elements that are key to building a culture of policy experimentation: incentives that mandate and support evidence production, experimentation, and failure; committed leadership; and a focus on getting results.

And the results are in! Last month, we used this A/B testing tool from ideas42 to test two different subject lines for this monthly email to see which one got a higher open rate (the percentage of people receiving the email who actually opened it).

  • Version A: Evidence-Informed Policymaking Reading List | February 2018
  • Version B: Which program works best? How do evidence maps inform policy? Is results-based aid more effective?

The Version A and B email blasts had open rates of 25.2% and 20.1%, respectively. The good news is that both rates are higher than the industry average for nongovernmental organizations! However, although Version A looks more effective than Version B, with a p-value of 0.156, the results were not significant at the 10% level. To yield a statistically significant result (to be more confident about which subject line attracts more interest) we could try this test again with a larger sample size. That means we need to send our reading list to more people! If you know anyone who would like to receive this monthly email on evidence-informed policymaking news and research, please forward this message and encourage them to sign up here: https://results4america.org/results-for-all-reading-list/

Thanks for reading!

 

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