Open Call for Applications: Peer Learning Workshop on Policy Implementation — April 24, 2018

Open Call for Applications: Peer Learning Workshop on Policy Implementation

Workshop Banner

Applications are due by May 14, 2018 via email to info@results4all.org.

Download the application here.

The Workshop:

Results for All and the African Institute for Development Policy (AFIDEP) will host a two-and-a-half-day workshop for policymakers from around the world to:

  • Discuss the challenges governments face in effectively implementing policies; and
  • Share experiences and strategies for using evidence to improve policy implementation.

The workshop will:

  • Facilitate dialogue, exchange, and active engagement among participants, to more deeply understand policy implementation challenges and lessons learned in different contexts; and
  • Introduce tools and approaches for improving implementation using various types of evidence.

During the workshop, participants will seek to answer questions such as, what are the most common barriers to effective policy implementation in different government office contexts? What type of evidence is needed to unlock implementation? How and when should it be considered? What strategies and mechanisms are governments in different countries introducing to improve and integrate evidence use in policy design and implementation? How can we learn from their experiences?

Workshop Outcomes:

  • Participants will learn from and interact with peers leading policy implementation activities from 7-8 national governments.
  • Participants will work in country teams to diagnose root causes of policy implementation challenges and create solution-based roadmaps.
  • Participants will provide feedback and shape future collaboration, including a potential global network for government leaders to advance the use of evidence in public policy.

Who Should Participate?

Results for All and AFIDEP invite public officials and policymakers to form a team of three or four individuals who are working together to implement a specific policy, in any sector, and who want to learn how and when to use evidence to overcome policy implementation challenges. A team must include members from at least two government ministries / departments / agencies, and be approved by senior leadership via the signature at the end of this application. Teams from seven to eight countries will be selected for participation in the workshop.

Teams are encouraged to include:

  • A program manager or director in a ministry / department / agency, who oversees the implementation of the policy in question.
  • A public official or practitioner at the national or subnational level, who has a role in operationalizing the policy, or collecting operational data and evidence.
  • An analyst, manager, or director from a national finance or planning ministry / department, who has a coordinating role in managing or evaluating policy.
  • A technical expert from a research or evaluation unit or statistical office, who has a role in producing or sourcing evidence to inform policy options or implementation strategies.

Teams will be expected to develop a power point presentation outlining a policy implementation challenge in advance of the workshop, and to engage in follow-up activities to put roadmaps into practice.

Teams from Brazil, Colombia, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Malawi, Mexico, Nigeria, Philippines, Rwanda, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia are especially encouraged to apply.

Download the application and apply here.

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Evidence-Informed Policymaking Reading List | April 2018 — April 2, 2018

Evidence-Informed Policymaking Reading List | April 2018

What to Read this Month

Advancing Evidence-Informed Policymaking: What’s Culture Got to Do With It? | Abeba Taddese, Results for All
“It takes time and intentional effort to build or change the evidence culture in government. And to truly do so, we will need to scratch beneath the surface to investigate the underlying assumptions that influence whether individuals and organizations actually use evidence in their work.”
We often hear from policymakers and partners about the importance of building or shifting the culture of evidence use, but what does that mean? Our latest blog explores the notion of an evidence culture and how to support it.

 

Ian Goldman is Acting Deputy Director General and Head of Evaluation and Research in South Africa’s Department of Planning, Monitoring and Eva
luation (DPME). His presentation, made at the Africa Evidence Forum in Nairobi last month, shares challenges and lessons for evidence use in the policy process. See his plea to researchers on the last slide!

 

“Because knowledge mobilisation means different things to different people it can also be difficult for new knowledge mobilisers to identify and clarify their role and communicate this effectively. This increases the risk of misunderstandings and misalignment between knowledge mobilisers and those they are working with.”
This article offers a practical framework based on a series of questions that can help knowledge mobilizers better understand their role: Why is knowledge being mobilized? Whose knowledge is being mobilized? What type of knowledge is being mobilized? How is knowledge being mobilized?

 

“Often, innovation starts in the field, and practice gradually influences policy over time. That means it is as important for research uptake to get communities of practice to engage with research.”
Learnings from Secure Livelihood’s Research Consortium’s work in DRC emphasize the need to focus not only on decision-makers in the research uptake equation, but to also consider the role of researchers. The Consortium has learned that to improve research uptake, it is important to strengthen institutional research capabilities as well as individual research skills, and to emphasize the value of research early, for example in higher education curricula, while also building relationships with policymakers.

 

“Rather than making large-scale decisions in the absence of fully conclusive or satisfactory evidence, experimentation can help to “de-risk” the decision-making process at this step of the policy cycle.”
This article encourages governments to consider small-scale experiments as a means to test new approaches and move incrementally toward larger evidence-informed policies and programs. It highlights what the government of Canada is doing in this regard, and also includes a nice description of how experimentation could be incorporated in each step of the policy cycle.

 

“Data and evidence can overcome such myths, but try and use government data – policy makers are more comfortable when you use data they know and trust.”
The Private Secretary to former President Kikwete in Tanzania shares insights on who to target, when to act, and how to communicate the message to improve your policy advocacy.

 

What We’re Working On

 

We’re putting the finishing touches on our network mapping report, in which we assess the demand for a global evidence network, and review 50+ existing networks for peer learning and evidence use in government. We also synthesize 13 lessons on network organization, engagement, and measurement. Thank you to everyone who shared insights and feedback! We look forward to publishing the report in the next few weeks.